Putting one foot in front of the other (part 5)

In a previous post, I suggested some of the fundamental, structural changes I think IT will have to undergo in the next 10-15 years. And to me, these changes are not optional: organizations will have to make them; the only question is who will risk the difficulties and step up to lead them (and reap the substantial rewards)?

With that done, I’ve come back to Earth a bit to kick off a series of more modest posts that look at some of the baby steps IT needs to take to evolve into a truly strategic capability.

To me, once an IT leader adopts the correct orientation of her department as a strategic asset primarily focused on delivering business value (rather than IT capabilities), she has  a number of very tactical areas to address:

  1. Demand pipeline
  2. Structured requirements
  3. Developer-heavy staffing
  4. Agile methods/approaches
  5. Service catalog
  6. Portfolio management (including rationalization)

In this post, we’ll take a look at the fifth, service catalog.

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Putting one foot in front of the other (part 4)

In a previous post, I suggested some of the fundamental, structural changes I think IT will have to undergo in the next 10-15 years. And to me, these changes are not optional: organizations will have to make them; the only question is who will risk the difficulties and step up to lead them (and reap the substantial rewards)?

With that done, I’ve come back to Earth a bit to kick off a series of more modest posts that look at some of the baby steps IT needs to take to evolve into a truly strategic capability.

To me, once an IT leader adopts the correct orientation of her department as a strategic asset primarily focused on delivering business value (rather than IT capabilities), she has  a number of very tactical areas to address:

  1. Demand pipeline
  2. Structured requirements
  3. Developer-heavy staffing
  4. Agile methods/approaches
  5. Service catalog
  6. Portfolio management (including rationalization)

In this post, we’ll take a look at the fourth, Agile methods/approaches.

Continue reading

Putting one foot in front of the other (part 3)

In a previous post, I suggested some of the fundamental, structural changes I think IT will have to undergo in the next 10-15 years. And to me, these changes are not optional: organizations will have to make them; the only question is who will risk the difficulties and step up to lead them (and reap the substantial rewards)?

With that done, I’ve come back to Earth a bit to kick off a series of more modest posts that look at some of the baby steps IT needs to take to evolve into a truly strategic capability.

To me, once an IT leader adopts the correct orientation of her department as a strategic asset primarily focused on delivering business value (rather than IT capabilities), she has  a number of very tactical areas to address:

  1. Demand pipeline
  2. Structured requirements
  3. Developer-heavy staffing
  4. Agile methods/approaches
  5. Service catalog
  6. Portfolio management (including rationalization)

In this post, we’ll take a look at the third, developer-heavy staffing.

Continue reading

Putting one foot in front of the other (part 2)

In a previous post, I suggested some of the fundamental, structural changes I think IT will have to undergo in the next 10-15 years. And to me, these changes are not optional: organizations will have to make them; the only question is who will risk the difficulties and step up to lead them (and reap the substantial rewards)?

With that done, I’ve come back to Earth a bit to kick off a series of more modest posts that look at some of the baby steps IT needs to take to evolve into a truly strategic capability.

To me, once an IT leader adopts the correct orientation of her department as a strategic asset primarily focused on delivering business value (rather than IT capabilities), she has a number of very tactical areas to address:

  1. Demand pipeline
  2. Structured requirements
  3. Developer-heavy staffing
  4. Agile methods/approaches
  5. Service catalog
  6. Portfolio management (including rationalization)

In this post, we’ll take a look at the second, structured requirements.

Continue reading

Putting one foot in front of the other (part 1)

In the last post, I suggested some of the fundamental, structural changes I think IT will have to undergo in the next 10-15 years. And to me, these changes are not optional: organizations will have to make them; the only question is who will risk the difficulties and step up to lead them (and reap the substantial rewards)?

With that done, I want to come back to Earth a bit, and kick off a series of more modest posts that look at some of the baby steps IT needs to take to evolve into a truly strategic capability.

Continue reading

Lean IT?

I recently kicked off a series of posts on the future of IT as well as some follow on posts looking at the pros and cons of treating IT as a separate department versus rolling its functions up into their business unit counterparts.

In this post (which is unreasonably long…so you may want to grab a snack) I want to change gears a bit, however, and lay out why I think IT in 2010 offers a particularly rich opportunity for organizations and their leaders to effect profound transformation within the modern corporation.

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Out of the frying pan and into the fire

Rabbi Jacob was sitting in his dining room hearing a dispute between two neighbors over an apple tree in the first neighbor’s yard.

“The apple tree is on my property, so the apples on it belong to me,” he said.

“You’re right,” Rabbi Jacob replied.

“But the branches extend over my property and I have to rake the leaves that fall, so I should get the apples that fall as well,” said the second neighbor.

“You’re right,” Rabbi Jacob replied.

His wife, listening from the kitchen and irritated at her husband, pokes her head into the dining room and says, “Jacob, you nebbish, they can’t both be right!”

“You’re right,” he replies.\1/

At the risk of incurring the wrath of the proverbial wife in the kitchen, I’m going to contradict my last post about doing away with IT and sketch out some of the reasons why dismantling IT and moving its functions into the business might be a bad idea.

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